TOS Crew: Alethia Magazine

Our teens are constantly writing, whether it’s elaborate notes in a make-believe world (complete with calligraphy and sealing wax), stories, poems, hymns of praise, even ongoing posts to an online role-playing game (Warrior Cats, if you wanted to know).

Even so, they don’t get much chance to read what other teens have written, outside of essays for their King’s Meadow (formerly Gileskirk) moral philosophy class, or blog posts, or the occasional Buzz. (Is that how you spell it? I don’t have a Buzz account, but many of the young people in our circle do, and seem to be constantly posting some thing or another.)Enter Alethia, a literary magazine by teens, for teens (though I must admit I enjoyed reading it as well). This 40-page, glossy, full-color magazine features stories, artwork, photography, poetry, and more. The writing in the issues we’ve seen is of high quality, and better yet, the platform strives to hold to Biblical values of truth and beauty. (“Alethia” means “truth” in Greek, as a matter of fact, something we just learned this week in our Biblical Greek class.)

The magazine is geared toward Christian youth, ages 13 to 19, so you see differing styles of expression, a spectrum of maturity of expression and interest, and a variety of topics which include reflections on a passage of Scripture (see the latest Writer’s Challenge, deadline October 15 if you’re interested in entering), nature, relationships, adventure, fantasy, the search for meaning (from a Christian perspective), and more.

Writing varies from relatively simple to sophisticated, as I’d expect with the authors’ range of ages. The artwork is beautifully rendered, the photography is breathtaking.

Regular features plus spotlight on youthful Christian writers

In addition to the contributors’ works of art and literature, the magazine offers regular features: book reviews, excerpts from classic Christian writing, the aforementioned Writer’s Challenge, a featured contributor, nature photo, and interview.

Our impressions

Of course, I imagine you want to hear our teens’ impressions of Alethia. Eldest was impressed. Youngest, not much of a reader, gave it a little more than a glance but really didn’t do much more than look at the artwork and photography.

Middlest, our most serious writer, was impressed with the production values most of all, especially the artwork. Since she is an avid reader, read at a college level early on, and enjoys such authors as George Grant, Dorothy Sayers and G.K. Chesterton, she has very high standards. It was interesting to hear her critique of the stories she read. (That one is a born editor.) Overall impression: acceptable. (Coming from her, that’s high praise.) Would she submit her writing to Alethia? Maybe.

Pricing info

A one-year subscription to Alethia Magazine is available for $26, and includes four full-color issues as well as shipping and handling.

To read more TOS Crew reviews of Alethia, please click here.

Disclaimer: Our family was provided a free print copy of Alethia’s Fall 2011 issue, as well as a digital copy of the Summer 2011 edition for review purposes (I think I lost the digital copy in our computer crash. At least, I haven’t been able to find it since getting our computer back just a few hours ago, thus I’m unable to go back and refresh my memory about it. Still, the quality of the print issue, and this free preview available online, is high). No additional compensation was involved.

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One response to “TOS Crew: Alethia Magazine

  1. Pingback: TOS Crew: Alethia Magazine | Home Sweet Home(school) - christianfamiliesnetwork.com - christian families network

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